Constituency 2021 (generalised)

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

4694
31
Added
02 Dec 2020

This dataset was first added to Stats NZ Geographic Data Service on 02 Dec 2020.

This dataset is the definitive set of annually released regional council constituency boundaries for 2021 as defined by the regional councils and/or Local Government Commission and maintained by Stats NZ (the custodian). This version contains 64 categories.

Constituencies are established under the Local Electoral Act 2001 and result from the division of a region for electoral purposes. If a regional council decides to have a Māori constituency, the constituencies within the council are known as general constituencies and Māori constituencies. Constituencies are divisions of regional council areas.

Constituencies are defined at meshblock level, and do not coincide with the statistical area 1 (SA1) geography or the statistical area 2 (SA2) geography. They are created, based on population, to be the voting areas within councils.

Names are provided with and without tohutō/macrons. The column name for those without macrons is suffixed ‘ascii’.

This generalised version has been simplified for rapid drawing and is designed for thematic or web mapping purposes.

Digital boundary data became freely available on 1 July 2007.

Layer ID 105139
Data type Vector multipolygon
Feature count 64
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Constituency 2021 Clipped (generalised)

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

3940
50
Added
03 Dec 2020

This dataset was first added to Stats NZ Geographic Data Service on 03 Dec 2020.

This dataset contains the annually released regional council constituency boundaries for 2021, as defined by the regional councils and/or Local Government Commission and maintained by Stats NZ (the custodian), clipped to the coastline. This clipped version has been created for map creation/cartographic purposes and so does not fully represent the official full extent boundaries. This version contains 64 categories.

Constituencies are established under the Local Electoral Act 2001 and result from the division of a region for electoral purposes.If a regional council decides to have a Māori constituency, the constituencies within the council are known as general constituencies and Māori constituencies.Constituencies are divisions of regional council areas. They are defined at meshblock level, and do not coincide with the statistical area 1 (SA1) geography or the statistical area 2 (SA2) geography. They are created, based on population, to be the voting areas within councils. Constituencies are required to reflect communities of interest. Their boundaries, so far as is practicable, coincide with those of territorial authorities or wards.

Names are provided with and without tohutō/macrons. The name field without macrons is suffixed ‘ascii’.

This generalised version has been simplified for rapid drawing and is designed for thematic or web mapping purposes.

Digital boundary data became freely available on 1 July 2007.

Layer ID 105145
Data type Vector multipolygon
Feature count 64
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Constituency 2022 (generalised)

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

2651
18
Added
29 Nov 2021

This dataset was first added to Stats NZ Geographic Data Service on 29 Nov 2021.

This dataset is the definitive set of annually released regional council constituency boundaries for 2022 as defined by the regional councils and/or Local Government Commission and maintained by Stats NZ (the custodian). This version contains 58 constituencies, excluding area outside regional council constituency.

Constituencies are established under the Local Electoral Act 2001 and result from the division of a region for electoral purposes. If a regional council decides to have a Māori constituency, the constituencies within the council are known as general constituencies and Māori constituencies. Constituencies are divisions of regional council areas.

Constituencies are defined at meshblock level, and do not coincide with the statistical area 1 (SA1) geography or the statistical area 2 (SA2) geography. They are created, based on population, to be the voting areas within councils.

Names are provided with and without tohutō/macrons. The column name for those without macrons is suffixed ‘ascii’.

This generalised version has been simplified for rapid drawing and is designed for thematic or web mapping purposes.

Digital boundary data became freely available on 1 July 2007.

Layer ID 106659
Data type Vector multipolygon
Feature count 64
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Constituency 2022 Clipped (generalised)

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

2310
8
Added
29 Nov 2021

This dataset was first added to Stats NZ Geographic Data Service on 29 Nov 2021.

This dataset is the definitive set of annually released regional council constituency boundaries for 2022 as defined by the regional councils and/or Local Government Commission and maintained by Stats NZ (the custodian). This clipped version has been created for map creation/cartographic purposes and so does not fully represent the official full extent boundaries. This version contains 58 constituencies, excluding area outside regional council constituency.

Constituencies are established under the Local Electoral Act 2001 and result from the division of a region for electoral purposes. If a regional council decides to have a Māori constituency, the constituencies within the council are known as general constituencies and Māori constituencies. Constituencies are divisions of regional council areas.

Constituencies are defined at meshblock level, and do not coincide with the statistical area 1 (SA1) geography or the statistical area 2 (SA2) geography. They are created, based on population, to be the voting areas within councils.

Names are provided with and without tohutō/macrons. The column name for those without macrons is suffixed ‘ascii’.

This generalised version has been simplified for rapid drawing and is designed for thematic or web mapping purposes.

Digital boundary data became freely available on 1 July 2007.

Layer ID 106660
Data type Vector multipolygon
Feature count 64
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Constituency 2023 (generalised)

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

1112
3
Added
30 Nov 2022

This dataset was first added to Stats NZ Geographic Data Service on 30 Nov 2022.

This dataset is the definitive set of regional council constituency boundaries for 2023 as defined by the regional councils and Local Government Commission but maintained by Stats NZ (the custodian). Constituencies are established under the Local Electoral Act 2001 and result from the division of a region for electoral purposes.

If a regional council decides to have a Māori constituency, the constituencies within the council are known as general constituencies and Māori constituencies. Constituencies are divisions of regional council areas. They are defined at meshblock level, and do not coincide with the statistical area 1 (SA1) geography or the statistical area 2 (SA2) geography. They are created, based on population, to be the voting areas within councils. Constituencies are required to reflect communities of interest. Their boundaries, so far as is practicable, coincide with those of territorial authorities or wards.

The boundaries of constituencies may be reviewed before each three-yearly local government election. Regional councils must review their representation arrangements at least once every six years. The provisions for such reviews are in the Local Government Act 2002.

Numbering

Constituencies are numbered based on their corresponding regional council. Each constituency has a unique four-digit code. The first two digits represent the regional council that the constituency lies within. The last two digits are sequential and represent the number of constituencies within a regional council. For example, the West Coast Regional Council (12) contains three constituencies, which are coded 1201, 1202, and 1203.

Generalised version

This generalised version has been simplified for rapid drawing and is designed for thematic or web mapping purposes.

Macrons

Names are provided with and without tohutō/macrons. The column name for those without macrons is suffixed ‘ascii’.

Digital data

Digital boundary data became freely available on 1 July 2007.

To download geographic classifications in table formats such as CSV please use Ariā

Layer ID 111178
Data type Vector multipolygon
Feature count 64
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Constituency 2023 Clipped (generalised)

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

1011
5
Added
30 Nov 2022

This dataset was first added to Stats NZ Geographic Data Service on 30 Nov 2022.

This dataset is the definitive version of the annually released regional council constituency boundaries as at 1 January 2023 as defined by the territorial authorities and/or Local Government Commission, and maintained by Stats NZ (the custodian), clipped to the coastline. This clipped version has been created for cartographic purposes and so does not fully represent the official full extent boundaries. This version contains 58 constituencies, excluding area outside regional council constituency.

If a regional council decides to have a Māori constituency, the constituencies within the council are known as general constituencies and Māori constituencies. Constituencies are divisions of regional council areas. They are defined at meshblock level, and do not coincide with the statistical area 1 (SA1) geography or the statistical area 2 (SA2) geography. They are created, based on population, to be the voting areas within councils. Constituencies are required to reflect communities of interest. Their boundaries, so far as is practicable, coincide with those of territorial authorities or wards.

The boundaries of constituencies may be reviewed before each three-yearly local government election. Regional councils must review their representation arrangements at least once every six years. The provisions for such reviews are in the Local Government Act 2002.

Numbering

Constituencies are numbered based on their corresponding regional council. Each constituency has a unique four-digit code. The first two digits represent the regional council that the constituency lies within. The last two digits are sequential and represent the number of constituencies within a regional council. For example, the West Coast Regional Council (12) contains three constituencies, which are coded 1201, 1202, and 1203.

Clipped version

This clipped version has been created for cartographic purposes and so does not fully represent the official full extent boundaries.

Macrons

Names are provided with and without tohutō/macrons. The column name for those without macrons is suffixed ‘ascii’.

Digital data

Digital boundary data became freely available on 1 July 2007.

To download geographic classifications in table formats such as CSV please use Ariā

Layer ID 111177
Data type Vector multipolygon
Feature count 64
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Functional Urban Area 2018

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

7223
145
Added
10 Feb 2021

This dataset was first added to Stats NZ Geographic Data Service on 10 Feb 2021.

The functional urban area (FUA) classification identifies small urban areas and rural areas that are integrated with larger urban areas to create FUAs.

Workplace address and usual residence address data from the 2018 Census of Population and Dwellings were used to identify satellite urban areas (1,000–4,999 residents), and rural statistical area 1s (SA1s) from which at least 40 percent of workers commuted to urban areas with more than 5,000 residents.

An FUA includes Urban rural (UR) 2018 urban areas, rural settlements and rural SA1s where there is: an urban core, one or more secondary urban cores, one or more satellite urban areas, and rural hinterland (rural settlements or rural SA1s).

The FUA indicator (IFUA) classifies UR2018 urban areas and rural SA1s according to their character within their FUA, e.g. urban core, satellite urban area.

The 53 FUAs are classified by population size. The urban core’s population rather than the entire FUA’s population is used to maintain consistency between the descriptions of UR2018 urban area and FUA type (TFUA).

FUAs that have more than 100,000 residents living in their urban core are known as metropolitan areas, while smaller FUAs are divided into large (core population 30,000–99,999), medium (core population 10,000–29,999), and small regional centres (core population 5,000–9,999).

The Greymouth urban area population is less than 10,000 but is classified as a medium regional centre, consistent with its treatment as a medium urban area in the Urban accessibility (UA) 2018 classification.

Names are provided with and without tohutō/macrons. The name field without macrons is suffixed ‘ascii’.

For more detail, and classifications, please refer to Ariā.

Digital boundary data became freely available on 1 July 2007.

Layer ID 105288
Data type Vector multipolygon
Feature count 139
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Functional Urban Area 2022 (generalised)

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

3471
33
Added
01 Dec 2021

This dataset was first added to Stats NZ Geographic Data Service on 01 Dec 2021.

The functional urban area (FUA) classification identifies small urban areas and rural areas that are integrated with major, large, and medium urban areas to create FUAs.

Workplace address and usual residence address data from the 2018 Census of Population and Dwellings were used to identify satellite urban areas (1,000–4,999 residents), and rural statistical area 1s (SA1s) from which at least 40 percent of workers commuted to urban areas with more than 5,000 residents.

An FUA includes Urban rural (UR) 2018 urban areas, rural settlements and rural SA1s where there is: an urban core, one or more secondary urban cores, one or more satellite urban areas, and rural hinterland (rural settlements or rural SA1s).

The FUA indicator (IFUA) classifies UR2018 urban areas and rural SA1s according to their character within their FUA, e.g., urban core, satellite urban area. The information from the Stats NZ classification can be accessed using the classification tool Ariā.

The 53 FUAs are classified by population size. The urban core’s population rather than the entire FUA’s population is used to maintain consistency between the descriptions of UR2018 urban area and FUA type (TFUA).

FUAs that have more than 100,000 residents living in their urban core are known as metropolitan areas, while smaller FUAs are divided into large (core population 30,000–99,999), medium (core population 10,000–29,999), and small regional centres (core population 5,000–9,999).

Names are provided with and without tohutō/macrons. The name field without macrons is suffixed ‘ascii’.

For more detail, and classifications, please refer to Ariā.

Digital boundary data became freely available on 1 July 2007.

Layer ID 106704
Data type Vector multipolygon
Feature count 139
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Functional Urban Area 2022 Clipped (generalised)

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

3124
43
Added
01 Dec 2021

This dataset was first added to Stats NZ Geographic Data Service on 01 Dec 2021.

The functional urban area (FUA) classification identifies small urban areas and rural areas that are integrated with major, large, and medium urban areas to create FUAs. This dataset is clipped to the coastline. This clipped version has been created for map creation/cartographic purposes and so does not fully represent the official full extent boundaries.

Workplace address and usual residence address data from the 2018 Census of Population and Dwellings were used to identify satellite urban areas (1,000–4,999 residents), and rural statistical area 1s (SA1s) from which at least 40 percent of workers commuted to urban areas with more than 5,000 residents.

An FUA includes Urban rural (UR) 2018 urban areas, rural settlements and rural SA1s where there is: an urban core, one or more secondary urban cores, one or more satellite urban areas, and rural hinterland (rural settlements or rural SA1s).

The FUA indicator (IFUA) classifies UR2018 urban areas and rural SA1s according to their character within their FUA, e.g., urban core, satellite urban area. The information from the Stats NZ classification can be accessed using the classification tool Ariā.

The 53 FUAs are classified by population size. The urban core’s population rather than the entire FUA’s population is used to maintain consistency between the descriptions of UR2018 urban area and FUA type (TFUA).

FUAs that have more than 100,000 residents living in their urban core are known as metropolitan areas, while smaller FUAs are divided into large (core population 30,000–99,999), medium (core population 10,000–29,999), and small regional centres (core population 5,000–9,999).

Names are provided with and without tohutō/macrons. The name field without macrons is suffixed ‘ascii’.

For more detail, and classifications, please refer to Ariā.

Digital boundary data became freely available on 1 July 2007.

Layer ID 106705
Data type Vector multipolygon
Feature count 139
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Functional Urban Area 2023 (generalised)

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

75620
23
Added
07 Dec 2022

This dataset was first added to Stats NZ Geographic Data Service on 07 Dec 2022.

2023 Functional Urban Area update

For the 2023 FUA, there have been minor updates from the 2018 FUAs to align with changes to urban rural (UR) boundaries and statistical area 1 (SA1) composition. FUA 2023 is still based on the analysis of 2018 Census of Population and Dwellings commuting data. The Wanaka urban area, whose population has grown to be more than 10,000 based on population estimates, has been reclassified to a medium urban area in the 2023 UR and a medium regional centre in the FUA type.

Description

This dataset is the definitive version of the Functional Urban Area boundaries as at 1 January 2023, as defined by Stats NZ.

The functional urban area (FUA) classification identifies small urban areas and rural areas that are integrated with major, large, and medium urban areas to create FUAs. In 2023, there are 53 FUAs,excluding ‘land area outside functional urban area’ (9001) and ‘water area outside functional urban area’ (9002). The FUA classificationuses the urban rural (UR) geography to demarcate urban areas, and statistical area 1 areas(SA1s) to demarcate surrounding hinterland (the commuting zone) within FUAs, and rural and water areas outside FUAs.

FUAs represent a populated urban core/s and its commuting zone. Workplace address and usual residence address data from the 2018 Census of Population and Dwellings were used to identify satellite urban areas (1,000–4,999 residents), rural settlements and other rural SA1s from which at least 40 percent of workers commuted to urban areas with more than 5,000 residents.

FUA numbering and naming

The FUA classification identifies FUAs by the name of the most highly populated urban area it contains, for example, the Christchurch FUA includes the Christchurch urban core and Rangiora, Kaiapoi, and Rolleston secondary urban cores. There is one exception to the naming rule. The Paraparaumu-Waikanae-Paekakariki conurbation and surrounding hinterland is named Kapiti Coast.

The FUA classification has a two-level hierarchical structure, joined together to create each FUA code. Level 1 is classified by FUA type (TFUA) a one-digit code and level 2, which has three-digit codes numbered approximately north to south. Some examples are: 1001 Auckland, 2001 Whangārei, 3001 Cambridge, and 4001 Kaitāia.

FUA type (TFUA)

FUAs are further categorised by population size. The urban core’s population rather than the entire FUA’s population is used to maintain consistency between the descriptions of UR urban area and FUA type. The categories are, by code:

1 Metropolitan area – more than 100,000 residents living in the urban core,

2 Large regional centre – urban core population 30,000–99,999,

3 Medium regional centre – urban core population 10,000–29,999,

4 Small regional centre – urban core population 5,000–9,999, and,

9 Area outside functional urban area.

The Greymouth urban area population is less than 10,000 but is classified as a medium regional centre, consistent with its treatment as a medium urban area in the UA classification.

To differentiate from the UR classification, when referring to FUAs by name, their FUA type should also be mentioned, for example, Christchurch metropolitan area, Whangarei regional centre.

FUA indicator (IFUA)

The IFUA classifies UR2023 urban areas and rural SA1s according to their character within their FUA. The indicators, with their codes in brackets, are:

• urban area within functional urban area – urban core (101), secondary urban core (102), satellite urban area (103),

• rural area within functional urban area – hinterland (201),

• area outside functional urban area – land area outside functional urban area (901), water area outside functional urban area (902).

Further information on the urban rural indicator is available on the Stats NZ classification tool Ariā.

For more information please refer to the Statistical standard for geographic areas 2023.

Generalised version

This generalised version has been simplified for rapid drawing and is designed for thematic or web mapping purposes.

Macrons

Names are provided with and without tohutō/macrons. The column name for those without macrons is suffixed ‘ascii’.

Digital data

Digital boundary data became freely available on 1 July 2007.

Layer ID 111270
Data type Vector multipolygon
Feature count 138
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed
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