Urban Rural 2023 Clipped (generalised)

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

23940
14
Added
30 Nov 2022

This dataset was first added to Stats NZ Geographic Data Service on 30 Nov 2022.

Urban rural 2023 update

UR 2023 is the first major update of the geography since it was first created in 2018. The update is to ensure UR geographies are relevant and meet criteria before each five-yearly population and dwelling census. UR 2023 contains 13 new rural settlements and 7 new small urban areas. Updates were made to reflect real world change including new subdivisions and motorways, and to improve delineation of urban areas and rural settlements. The Wānaka urban area, whose population has grown to be more than 10,000 based on population estimates, has been reclassified to a medium urban area in the 2023 urban rural indicator.

In the 2023 classification there are:

  • 7 major urban areas
  • 13 large urban areas
  • 23 medium urban areas
  • 152 small urban areas
  • 402 rural settlements.

This dataset is the definitive version of the annually released urban rural (UR) boundaries as at 1 January 2023 as defined by Stats NZ (the custodian), clipped to the coastline. This clipped version has been created for cartographic purposes and so does not fully represent the official full extent boundaries. This version contains 689 UR areas, including 195 urban areas and 402 rural settlements.

Urban rural (UR) is an output geography that classifies New Zealand into areas that share common urban or rural characteristics and is used to disseminate a broad range of Stats NZ’s social, demographic and economic statistics.

The UR separately identifies urban areas, rural settlements, other rural areas, and water areas. Urban areas and rural settlements are form-based geographies delineated by the inspection of aerial imagery, local government land designations on district plan maps, address registers, property title data, and any other available information. However, because the underlying meshblock pattern is used to define the geographies, boundaries may not align exactly with local government land designations or what can be seen in aerial images. Other rural areas, and bodies of water represent areas not included within an urban area.

Urban areas are built from the statistical area 2 (SA2) geography, while rural and water areas are built from the statistical area 1 (SA1) geography.

Non-digitised

The following 4 non-digitised UR areas have been aggregated from the 16 non-digitised meshblocks/SA2s.

6901; Oceanic outside region, 6902; Oceanic oil rigs, 6903; Islands outside region, 6904; Ross Dependency outside region.

UR numbering and naming

Each urban area and rural settlement is a single geographic entity with a name and a numeric code.

Other rural areas, inland water areas, and inlets are defined by territorial authority; oceanic areas are defined by regional council; and each have a name and a numeric code.

Urban rural codes have four digits. North Island locations start with a 1, South Island codes start with a 2, oceanic codes start with a 6 and non-digitised codes start with 69.

Urban rural indicator (IUR)

The accompanying urban rural indicator (IUR) classifies the urban, rural, and water areas by type. Urban areas are further classified by the size of their estimated resident population:

  • major urban area – 100,000 or more residents,
  • large urban area – 30,000–99,999 residents,
  • medium urban area – 10,000–29,999 residents,
  • small urban area – 1,000–9,999 residents.

This was based on 2018 Census data and 2021 population estimates. Their IUR status (urban area size/rural settlement) may change if the 2023 Census population count moves them up or down a category.

The indicators, by name, with their codes in brackets, are:

urban area – major urban (11), large urban (12), medium urban (13), small urban (14),

rural area – rural settlement (21), rural other (22),

water – inland water (31), inlet (32), oceanic (33).

The urban rural indicator complements the urban rural geography and is an attribute in this dataset. Further information on the urban rural indicator is available on the Stats NZ classification and coding tool ARIA.

For more information please refer to the Statistical standard for geographic areas 2023.

Clipped version

This clipped version has been created for cartographic purposes and so does not fully represent the official full extent boundaries.

Macrons

Names are provided with and without tohutō/macrons. The column name for those without macrons is suffixed ‘ascii’.

Digital data

Digital boundary data became freely available on 1 July 2007.

To download geographic classifications in table formats such as CSV please use Ariā

Layer ID 111196
Data type Vector multipolygon
Feature count 689
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Urban Accessibility Indicator 2023 (generalised)

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

1482
3
Added
30 Nov 2022

This dataset was first added to Stats NZ Geographic Data Service on 30 Nov 2022.

2023 Urban Accessibility Indicator update

For the 2023 IUA, there have been minor updates to align with changes to the urban rural (UR) boundaries and SA1 composition. The drive time analysis has not been re-run since the release of IUA 2018. The Wānaka urban area, whose population has grown to bemore than 10,000 based on population estimates, has been reclassified to a medium urban area in the 2023 UR. However, it will continue to be classified as a small urban area in the IUA until the analysis is re-run for the next major update.

Description

This dataset is the definitive version of the Urban Accessibility Indicator boundaries as at 1 January 2023, as defined by Stats NZ.

The Urban Accessibility Indicator (IUA) classificationprovides a consistent measure of urban accessibility in order to distinguish the degrees of rurality in New Zealand. IUA classifies the geographic accessibility of rural statistical area 1s (SA1s) and small urban areas according to their proximity, or degree of remoteness, to larger urban areas.

The IUA methodology uses drive time from an SA1 address weighted centroid to the outside boundary of the nearest major, large, and medium urban area (from the UR classification), to classify rural SA1s and small urban areas to one of five categories of accessibility or remoteness. Small urban areas and rural settlements are assigned to a single category based on the classification of the majority of their SA1s. The Open Source Routing Machine service using the OpenStreetMap road network was used to calculate the drive times.

Rural SA1s and small urban areas are classified to the following categories:

High urban accessibility:

0 to 15 minutes from major urban areas,

Medium urban accessibility:

15 to 25 minutes from major urban areas,

0 to 25 minutes from large urban areas,

0 to 15 minutes from medium urban areas,

Low urban accessibility:

25 to 60 minutes from major or large urban areas,

15 to 60 minutes from medium urban areas,

Remote:

60 to 120 minutes from major, large or medium urban areas,

Very remote:

more than 120 minutes from major, large or medium urban areas.

The urban accessibility indicator (IUA) classifies urban, rural, and water areas by type. The high and medium urban accessibility categories are considered to be peri-urban.

The indicators, with their codes in brackets, are:

urban areas – major urban area (111), large urban area (112), medium urban area (113),

small urban and rural areas – high urban accessibility (221), medium urban accessibility (222), low urban accessibility (223), remote (224), very remote (225),

water areas – inland water (331), inlet (332), oceanic (333).

A concordance between SA1 and Urban Accessibility can be found on Ariā.

Urban accessibility indicator is also available as an attribute on Statistical Area 1 Higher Geographies 2023 (generalised).

For more information refer to Urban accessibility – methodology and classification or the Statistical standard for geographic areas 2023.

Generalised version

This generalised version has been simplified for rapid drawing and is designed for thematic or web mapping purposes.

Digital data

Digital boundary data became freely available on 1 July 2007.

To download geographic classifications in table formats such as CSV please use Ariā

Layer ID 111195
Data type Vector multipolygon
Feature count 11
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Territorial Authority 2023 (generalised)

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

1559
63
Added
30 Nov 2022

This dataset was first added to Stats NZ Geographic Data Service on 30 Nov 2022.

This dataset is the definitive version of the annually released territorial authority boundaries as at 1 January 2023 as defined by territorial authorities and/or Local Government Commission, and maintained by Stats NZ (the custodian). This version contains 67 territorial authorities, excluding ‘area outside territorial authority’.

Territorial authorities are the second tier of local government in New Zealand, below regional councils. They are defined under schedule 2, part 1 of the Local Government Act 2002 as city councils or district councils. Territorial authorities were established in 1989 when 205 territorial local authorities were replaced by 75 territorial authorities. Territorial boundaries must coincide with meshblock boundaries under schedule 3, clause 17 of the Local Government Act 2002.

There are 67 territorial authorities: 12 city councils, 53 district councils, Auckland Council, and Chatham Islands Council. Five territorial authorities (Auckland Council, Nelson City Council, and the Gisborne, Tasman, and Marlborough district councils) also perform the functions of a regional council and are therefore unitary authorities. The Chatham Islands Council performs some regional council functions.

Some territorial authority boundaries are coterminous with regional council boundaries but there are several exceptions. An example is Taupo District, which is split between four regions, although most of its area falls within the Waikato Region. When defining the boundaries of territorial authorities, the Local Government Commission bases considerable weight on the ‘community of interest’.

Territorial authorities are defined at meshblock level. Statistical area 1, statistical area 2 and statistical area 3 geographies nest within territorial authority boundaries.

Maintenance

Local government boundaries may be changed through the Local Government Act 2002, an Act of Parliament, or a natural process such as the middle line of a river changing its natural course.

The Territorial Authority classification is released annually on 1 January to coincide with the update of meshblocks, but there are not always changes from the previous classification.

1989:

New Zealand’s local government structural arrangements were significantly reformed by the Local Government Commission in 1989. Prior to reformation there were 205 territorial local authorities: 28 cities, 78 boroughs, 67 counties, 31 districts, and 1 town district, as well as a multitude of ad-hoc authorities such as pest control boards, drainage boards, catchment boards, and domain and reserve boards.

These were replaced by 74 territorial local authorities, 15 of which were cities and 58 districts. The exception was Chatham Islands County which retained its county status.

1990:

Invercargill was proclaimed a city.

1992:

Nelson-Marlborough Regional Council was abolished by a Local Government Amendment Act. Kaikoura District was transferred to the Canterbury Region. Nelson City, and Tasman and Marlborough districts became unitary authorities.

1995:

The Chatham Islands County was dissolved and reconstituted by a specific Act of Parliament as the "Chatham Islands Territory", with powers similar to those of territorial authorities and some functions similar to those of a regional council. This included the addition of territorial sea, a coastal buffer extending to twelve nautical miles from the coastline.

1995:

Tasman District boundary extended to align with the Tasman Region boundary at the 12-mile limit.

1998:

Not Applicable category changed to Area Outside Territorial Authority

2004:

Tauranga District changed to Tauranga City.2006:Banks Peninsula District merged into Christchurch City as a result of a Local Government Commission decision following a 2005 referendum.

2010:

Auckland Council established under the Local Government (Tamaki Makaurau Reorganisation) Act 2009. Rodney District, North Shore City, Waitakere City, Auckland City, Manukau City, Papakura District, and Franklin District territorial councils, and the Auckland Regional Council, were abolished to become a unitary authority known as the Auckland Council. The area now consists of one city council (with statutory provision for three Māori councillors), 13 wards, and 21 local boards.

2015:

Wanganui District Council name changed to Whanganui District Council effective 1 December 2015.

2020:

Otorohanga District Council name amended to Ōtorohanga District Council.

Opotiki District Council name amended to Ōpōtiki District Council.

Both changes were under schedule 2 of the Local Government Act 2002 and effective 17 January 2020.

2021:

A local government reorganisation transferred land between two territorial authorities, Western Bay of Plenty District and Tauranga City. The changes took effect on 19 February 2021 under schedule 3 of the Local Government Act 2002. Refer to the New Zealand Gazette notice for further details.

Numbering

The territorial authority classification is a flat classification. Territorial authorities are given a unique three-digit code. The classification contains 68 categories (including ‘999 – Area Outside Territorial Authority’).

Generalised version

This generalised version has been simplified for rapid drawing and is designed for thematic or web mapping purposes.

Macrons

Names are provided with and without tohutō/macrons. The column name for those without macrons is suffixed ‘ascii’.

Digital data

Digital boundary data became freely available on 1 July 2007.

To download geographic classifications in table formats such as CSV please use Ariā

Layer ID 111194
Data type Vector multipolygon
Feature count 68
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Territorial Authority 2023 Clipped (generalised)

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

1425
40
Added
30 Nov 2022

This dataset was first added to Stats NZ Geographic Data Service on 30 Nov 2022.

This dataset is the definitive version of the annually released territorial authority boundaries as at 1 January 2023 as defined by territorial authorities and/or Local Government Commission, and maintained by Stats NZ (the custodian), clipped to the coastline. This clipped version has been created for cartographic purposes and so does not fully represent the official full extent boundaries. This version contains 67 territorial authorities, excluding ‘area outside territorial authority’.

Territorial authorities are the second tier of local government in New Zealand, below regional councils. They are defined under schedule 2, part 1 of the Local Government Act 2002 as city councils or district councils. Territorial authorities were established in 1989 when 205 territorial local authorities were replaced by 75 territorial authorities. Territorial boundaries must coincide with meshblock boundaries under schedule 3, clause 17 of the Local Government Act 2002.

There are 67 territorial authorities: 12 city councils, 53 district councils, Auckland Council, and Chatham Islands Council. Five territorial authorities (Auckland Council, Nelson City Council, and the Gisborne, Tasman, and Marlborough district councils) also perform the functions of a regional council and are therefore unitary authorities. The Chatham Islands Council performs some regional council functions.

Some territorial authority boundaries are coterminous with regional council boundaries but there are several exceptions. An example is Taupo District, which is split between four regions, although most of its area falls within the Waikato Region. When defining the boundaries of territorial authorities, the Local Government Commission bases considerable weight on the ‘community of interest’.

Territorial authorities are defined at meshblock level. Statistical area 1, statistical area 2 and statistical area 3 geographies nest within territorial authority boundaries.

Maintenance

Local government boundaries may be changed through the Local Government Act 2002, an Act of Parliament, or a natural process such as the middle line of a river changing its natural course.

The Territorial Authority classification is released annually on 1 January to coincide with the update of meshblocks, but there are not always changes from the previous classification.

1989:

New Zealand’s local government structural arrangements were significantly reformed by the Local Government Commission in 1989. Prior to reformation there were 205 territorial local authorities: 28 cities, 78 boroughs, 67 counties, 31 districts, and 1 town district, as well as a multitude of ad-hoc authorities such as pest control boards, drainage boards, catchment boards, and domain and reserve boards.

These were replaced by 74 territorial local authorities, 15 of which were cities and 58 districts. The exception was Chatham Islands County which retained its county status.

1990:

Invercargill was proclaimed a city.

1992:

Nelson-Marlborough Regional Council was abolished by a Local Government Amendment Act. Kaikoura District was transferred to the Canterbury Region. Nelson City, and Tasman and Marlborough districts became unitary authorities.

1995:

The Chatham Islands County was dissolved and reconstituted by a specific Act of Parliament as the "Chatham Islands Territory", with powers similar to those of territorial authorities and some functions similar to those of a regional council. This included the addition of territorial sea, a coastal buffer extending to twelve nautical miles from the coastline.

1995:

Tasman District boundary extended to align with the Tasman Region boundary at the 12-mile limit.

1998:

Not Applicable category changed to Area Outside Territorial Authority

2004:

Tauranga District changed to Tauranga City.2006:Banks Peninsula District merged into Christchurch City as a result of a Local Government Commission decision following a 2005 referendum.

2010:

Auckland Council established under the Local Government (Tamaki Makaurau Reorganisation) Act 2009. Rodney District, North Shore City, Waitakere City, Auckland City, Manukau City, Papakura District, and Franklin District territorial councils, and the Auckland Regional Council, were abolished to become a unitary authority known as the Auckland Council. The area now consists of one city council (with statutory provision for three Māori councillors), 13 wards, and 21 local boards.

2015:

Wanganui District Council name changed to Whanganui District Council effective 1 December 2015.

2020:

Otorohanga District Council name amended to Ōtorohanga District Council.

Opotiki District Council name amended to Ōpōtiki District Council.

Both changes were under schedule 2 of the Local Government Act 2002 and effective 17 January 2020.

2021:

A local government reorganisation transferred land between two territorial authorities, Western Bay of Plenty District and Tauranga City. The changes took effect on 19 February 2021 under schedule 3 of the Local Government Act 2002. Refer to the New Zealand Gazette notice for further details.

Numbering

The territorial authority classification is a flat classification. Territorial authorities are given a unique three-digit code. The classification contains 68 categories (including ‘999 – Area Outside Territorial Authority’).

Clipped version

This clipped version has been created for cartographic purposes and so does not fully represent the official full extent boundaries.

Macrons

Names are provided with and without tohutō/macrons. The column name for those without macrons is suffixed ‘ascii’.

Digital data

Digital boundary data became freely available on 1 July 2007.

To download geographic classifications in table formats such as CSV please use Ariā

Layer ID 111193
Data type Vector multipolygon
Feature count 68
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Māori Ward 2023 (generalised)

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

1388
4
Added
30 Nov 2022

This dataset was first added to Stats NZ Geographic Data Service on 30 Nov 2022.

This dataset is the definitive version of the annually released Māori ward boundaries as at 1 January 2023 as defined by the territorial authorities and/or Local Government Commission, and maintained by Stats NZ (the custodian). In 2023, there are 34 Māori wards (excluding Area Outside Māori Ward) within 29 territorial authorities.

The Local Electoral Act 2001 provides that Māori wards may be established in territorial authorities. If a territorial authority decides to have Māori wards, the wards within the council are known as general wards and Māori wards.

The first Māori ward was established by representation review in 2019 and first appeared in the 2020 geographic boundaries released by Stats NZ. Changes to government legislation that allowed councils to decide on whether to include Māori wards in their arrangements resulted in 33 new Māori wards being added to the 2023 classification.

Māori ward boundaries are defined at meshblock level.

Numbering

Māori wards are numbered based on their corresponding territorial authority. Each Māori ward has a unique five-digit code. The first three digits represent the territorial authority that the Māori ward lies within. The following two digits are sequential and represent the number of Māori wards within a territorial authority.

Territorial authorities that do not have Māori wards use “99” at the end of the Māori ward code, and the descriptor “Area Outside Māori Ward”.

There is also a code of 99999 for those areas outside of territorial authority areas.

Generalised version

This generalised version has been simplified for rapid drawing and is designed for thematic or web mapping purposes.

Macrons

Names are provided with and without tohutō/macrons. The column name for those without macrons is suffixed ‘ascii’.

Digital data

Digital boundary data became freely available on 1 July 2007.

To download geographic classifications in table formats such as CSV please use Ariā

Layer ID 111192
Data type Vector multipolygon
Feature count 73
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Māori Ward 2023 Clipped (generalised)

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

1427
7
Added
30 Nov 2022

This dataset was first added to Stats NZ Geographic Data Service on 30 Nov 2022.

This dataset is the definitive version of the annually released Māori ward boundaries as at 1 January 2023 as defined by the territorial authorities and/or Local Government Commission, and maintained by Stats NZ (the custodian), clipped to the coastline. This clipped version has been created for cartographic purposes and so does not fully represent the official full extent boundaries. In 2023, there are 34 Māori wards (excluding Area Outside Māori Ward) within 29 territorial authorities.

The Local Electoral Act 2001 provides that Māori wards may be established in territorial authorities. If a territorial authority decides to have Māori wards, the wards within the council are known as general wards and Māori wards.

The first Māori ward was established by representation review in 2019 and first appeared in the 2020 geographic boundaries released by Stats NZ. Changes to government legislation that allowed councils to decide on whether to include Māori wards in their arrangements resulted in 33 new Māori wards being added to the 2023 classification.

Māori ward boundaries are defined at meshblock level.

Numbering

Māori wards are numbered based on their corresponding territorial authority. Each Māori ward has a unique five-digit code. The first three digits represent the territorial authority that the Māori ward lies within. The following two digits are sequential and represent the number of Māori wards within a territorial authority.

Territorial authorities that do not have Māori wards use “99” at the end of the Māori ward code, and the descriptor “Area Outside Māori Ward”.

There is also a code of 99999 for those areas outside of territorial authority areas.

Clipped version

This clipped version has been created for cartographic purposes and so does not fully represent the official full extent boundaries.

Macrons

Names are provided with and without tohutō/macrons. The column name for those without macrons is suffixed ‘ascii’.

Digital data

Digital boundary data became freely available on 1 July 2007.

To download geographic classifications in table formats such as CSV please use Ariā

Layer ID 111191
Data type Vector multipolygon
Feature count 73
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Ward 2023 (generalised)

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

1413
11
Added
30 Nov 2022

This dataset was first added to Stats NZ Geographic Data Service on 30 Nov 2022.

This dataset is the definitive version of the annually released ward boundaries as at 1 January 2023 as defined by the territorial authorities and Local Government Commission and maintained by Stats NZ. This version contains 224 wards, excluding ‘area outside ward’.

Wards are defined under the Local Electoral Act 2001 and result from dividing a territorial authority for electoral purposes. Wards were originally set up within any territorial authority with a population of at least 20,000. The ward system was designed to allow for the recognition of communities within a territorial authority and to increase community involvement in the local government system.

Territorial authorities can now choose whether they would like to maintain electoral wards. As a result, the number of wards has steadily decreased since they were first created in 1989. Ward boundaries are reviewed in the year before the three-yearly local government elections.

Wards are defined at meshblock level, and do not coincide with the statistical area 1 (SA1) geography or the statistical area 2 (SA2) geographies.

Numbering

Wards are numbered based on their corresponding territorial authority. Each ward has a unique five-digit number. The first three digits represent the territorial authority that the ward lies within. The following two digits are sequential and represent the number of wards within a territorial authority. For example, Westland District (057) has three wards, which are coded 05701, 05702, and 05703.

Some territorial authorities do not use wards. In the classification, these territorial authorities use ‘99’ for the last two digits of the ward code, and the descriptor “Area Outside Ward”.

Generalised version

This generalised version has been simplified for rapid drawing and is designed for thematic or web mapping purposes.

Macrons

Names are provided with and without tohutō/macrons. The column name for those without macrons is suffixed ‘ascii’.

Digital data

Digital boundary data became freely available on 1 July 2007.

To download geographic classifications in table formats such as CSV please use Ariā

Layer ID 111190
Data type Vector multipolygon
Feature count 233
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Ward 2023 Clipped (generalised)

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

1279
10
Added
30 Nov 2022

This dataset was first added to Stats NZ Geographic Data Service on 30 Nov 2022.

This dataset is the definitive version of the annually released ward boundaries as at 1 January 2023 as defined by the territorial authorities and Local Government Commission and maintained by Stats NZ (the custodian) clipped to the coastline. This clipped version has been created for cartographic purposes and so does not fully represent the official full extent boundaries. This version contains 224 wards, excluding ‘area outside ward’.

Wards are defined under the Local Electoral Act 2001 and result from dividing a territorial authority for electoral purposes. Wards were originally set up within any territorial authority with a population of at least 20,000. The ward system was designed to allow for the recognition of communities within a territorial authority and to increase community involvement in the local government system.

Territorial authorities can now choose whether they would like to maintain electoral wards. As a result, the number of wards has steadily decreased since they were first created in 1989. Ward boundaries are reviewed in the year before the three-yearly local government elections.

Wards are defined at meshblock level, and do not coincide with the statistical area 1 (SA1) geography or the statistical area 2 (SA2) geographies.

Numbering

Wards are numbered based on their corresponding territorial authority. Each ward has a unique five-digit number. The first three digits represent the territorial authority that the ward lies within. The following two digits are sequential and represent the number of wards within a territorial authority. For example, Westland District (057) has three wards, which are coded 05701, 05702, and 05703.

Some territorial authorities do not use wards. In the classification, these territorial authorities use ‘99’ for the last two digits of the ward code, and the descriptor “Area Outside Ward”.

Clipped version

This clipped version has been created for cartographic purposes and so does not fully represent the official full extent boundaries.

Macrons

Names are provided with and without tohutō/macrons. The column name for those without macrons is suffixed ‘ascii’.

Digital data

Digital boundary data became freely available on 1 July 2007.

To download geographic classifications in table formats such as CSV please use Ariā

Layer ID 111189
Data type Vector multipolygon
Feature count 233
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Community Board 2023 (generalised)

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

1314
5
Added
30 Nov 2022

This dataset was first added to Stats NZ Geographic Data Service on 30 Nov 2022.

This dataset is the definitive set of community board boundaries for 2023 as defined by the territorial authorities and Local Government Commission but maintained by Stats NZ. This classification includes community boards and local boards.

Community boards and local boards provide voting representation at a community level. They are defined under the Local Government Act 2002 and Local Electoral Act 2001. Local boards were introduced as part of the new local government arrangements for Auckland in 2010. Community boards and local boards are defined at meshblock level and do not coincide with the statistical area 1 (SA1) or statistical area 2 (SA2) geographies.

Structure

The purpose of community boards is to administer the affairs of communities with a population of 1,500 or more people within rural, urban, or metropolitan areas of a territorial authority. A community board’s functions, powers, and duties are at the discretion of its parent territorial authority, so these may differ between community boards.

Community boards are a link between the council and the community. Community boards can be established at any time but may only be abolished as part of a council’s regular representation review carried out before the triennial local government elections; this is provided for in the Local Electoral Act 2001.

Local boards can be established within any unitary authority. Local boards share governance with a council’s governing body, and each has complementary responsibilities guaranteed by legislation. Local boards can propose bylaws and they gather community views on local and regional matters.

Community board and local board boundaries must coincide with meshblock boundaries under Local Government Act 2002 and Local Electoral Act 2001. Community boards, local boards and wards both sit within territorial authorities. There is not a one-to-one relationship and community boards and local boards may straddle wards.

Numbering

The Community Board classification is a flat classification. Community boards are numbered based on their corresponding territorial authority. Each community board has a unique five-digit number. The first three digits refer to the territorial authority that the community board lies within. The following two digits are sequential and represent the number of community boards within the territorial authority. For example, Tararua District (041) has two community boards numbered 04101 and 04102. The rest of the district is not represented by a community board and is coded ‘04199 Area outside community’.

The descriptor ‘Area outside community’ is applied to each individual territorial authority that has any areas outside community board or does not have community boards.

There is also a code of 99999 for those areas outside of territorial authority areas.

Maintenance

The Local Electoral Act 2001 provides for community boards to be reviewed before every second triennial local government election.

Local boards cannot be abolished or their boundaries changed except through a reorganisation process.

The Community Board classification is released annually on 1 January to coincide with the update of meshblocks, but there are not always changes from the previous classification.

Generalised version

This generalised version has been simplified for rapid drawing and is designed for thematic or web mapping purposes.

Macrons

Names are provided with and without tohutō/macrons. The column name for those without macrons is suffixed ‘ascii’.

Digital data

Digital boundary data became freely available on 1 July 2007.

To download geographic classifications in table formats such as CSV please use Ariā

Layer ID 111188
Data type Vector multipolygon
Feature count 187
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Community Board 2023 Clipped (generalised)

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

1379
7
Added
30 Nov 2022

This dataset was first added to Stats NZ Geographic Data Service on 30 Nov 2022.

This dataset is the definitive version of the annually released community board boundaries as at 1 January 2023, as defined by the territorial authorities and/or Local Government Commission and maintained by Stats NZ, clipped to the coastline. This clipped version has been created for cartographic purposes and so does not fully represent the official full extent boundaries. This version contains 111 community boards and 21 Auckland local boards, excluding ‘area outside community board’

Community boards and local boards provide voting representation at a community level. They are defined under the Local Government Act 2002and Local Electoral Act 2001. Local boards were introduced as part of the new local government arrangements for Auckland in 2010. Community boards and local boards are defined at meshblock level and do not coincide with the statistical area 1 (SA1) or statistical area 2 (SA2) geographies.

Structure

The purpose of community boards is to administer the affairs of communities with a population of 1,500 or more people within rural, urban, or metropolitan areas of a territorial authority. A community board’s functions, powers, and duties are at the discretion of its parent territorial authority, so these may differ between community boards.

Community boards are a link between the council and the community. Community boards can be established at any time but may only be abolished as part of a council’s regular representation review carried out before the triennial local government elections; this is provided for in the Local Electoral Act 2001.

Local boards can be established within any unitary authority. Local boards share governance with a council’s governing body, and each has complementary responsibilities guaranteed by legislation. Local boards can propose bylaws and they gather community views on local and regional matters.

Community board and local board boundaries must coincide with meshblock boundaries under Local Government Act 2002 and Local Electoral Act 2001. Community boards, local boards and wards both sit within territorial authorities. There is not a one-to-one relationship and community boards and local boards may straddle wards.

Numbering

The Community Board classification is a flat classification. Community boards are numbered based on their corresponding territorial authority. Each community board has a unique five-digit number. The first three digits refer to the territorial authority that the community board lies within. The following two digits are sequential and represent the number of community boards within the territorial authority. For example, Tararua District (041) has two community boards numbered 04101 and 04102. The rest of the district is not represented by a community board and is coded ‘04199 Area outside community’.

The descriptor ‘Area outside community’ is applied to each individual territorial authority that has any areas outside community board or does not have community boards.

There is also a code of 99999 for those areas outside of territorial authority areas.

Maintenance

The Local Electoral Act 2001 provides for community boards to be reviewed before every second triennial local government election.

Local boards cannot be abolished or their boundaries changed except through a reorganisation process.

The Community Board classification is released annually on 1 January to coincide with the update of meshblocks, but there are not always changes from the previous classification.

Clipped Version

This clipped version has been created for cartographic purposes and so does not fully represent the official full extent boundaries.

Macrons

Names are provided with and without tohutō/macrons. The column name for those without macrons is suffixed ‘ascii’.

Digital data

Digital boundary data became freely available on 1 July 2007.

To download geographic classifications in table formats such as CSV please use Ariā

Layer ID 111187
Data type Vector multipolygon
Feature count 187
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed
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