Urban Rural 2021 (generalised)

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

10507
313
Added
06 Dec 2020

This dataset was first added to Stats NZ Geographic Data Service on 06 Dec 2020.

This dataset is the definitive set of annually released urban rural boundaries for 2021 as defined by Stats NZ. This version contains 722 urban rural categories.

The urban rural geography was introduced as part of the Statistical Standard for Geographic Areas 2018 (SSGA18) which replaced the New Zealand Standard Areas Classification (NZSAC92). The urban rural geography replaces the (NZSAC92) urban area geography.

Urban rural is an output geography that classifies New Zealand into areas that share common urban or rural characteristics and is used to disseminate a broad range of Stats NZ’s social, demographic and economic statistics.

The urban rural indicator complements the urban rural geography and is an attribute in this dataset. Further information on the urban rural indicator is available on the Stats NZ classification and coding tool ARIA.

Names are provided with and without tohutō/macrons. The name field without macrons is suffixed ‘ascii’.

This generalised version has been simplified for rapid drawing and is designed for thematic or web mapping purposes.

Digital boundary data became freely available on 1 July 2007.

Layer ID 105158
Data type Vector multipolygon
Feature count 722 (incl. 4 with empty or null geometries)
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Territorial Authority Local Board 2023 Clipped (generalised)

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

1114
13
Added
30 Nov 2022

This dataset was first added to Stats NZ Geographic Data Service on 30 Nov 2022.

Territorial authorities

Territorial authorities are the second tier of local government in New Zealand, below regional councils. They are defined under schedule 2, part 1 of the Local Government Act 2002 as city councils or district councils. Territorial authorities were established in 1989 when 205 territorial local authorities were replaced by 75 territorial authorities. Territorial boundaries must coincide with meshblock boundaries under schedule 3, clause 17 of the Local Government Act 2002.

Local boards

Local boards share governance with a council’s governing body and each has complementary responsibilities, guaranteed by legislation. Local boards can propose bylaws and they gather community views on local and regional matters. Legislation enacted in 2012 allows for the establishment of local boards in areas of new unitary authorities that are predominantly urban and have a population of more than 400,000. The boundaries of local boards cannot be abolished or changed except through a reorganisation process. If new local boards are created they will be incorporated into this classification.

Local boards are defined at meshblock level. Stats NZ must be consulted if there is a proposed boundary change that does not align with the meshblock pattern. Local boards do not coincide with the statistical area 1 (SA1) or statistical area 2 (SA2) geographies.

Auckland Council local boards

The Auckland Council was established in November 2010 under the Local Government (Tamaki Makaurau Reorganisation) Act 2009. Seven territorial authorities within the Auckland Region were abolished and replaced by the unitary authority Auckland Council. Local boards fall within the community board classification. Changes were reflected in the 2011 and subsequent community board classifications.

For statistical outputs that use territorial authorities to aggregate and report data Auckland Council is treated as a single geographic entity, whereas previously data was provided for the seven territorial authorities. Presenting data for this single territorial authority hides meaningful patterns and trends for a significant portion of the population. A solution was to create a new classification of territorial authorities that includes the local boards for Auckland.

Numbering

TALB is a flat classification. Each category has a unique five-digit code. The first three digits represent the territorial authority code, ranging from 001 to 076 (with 999 being Area Outside Territorial Authority). The last two digits indicate if the territorial authority is further defined at local board level: 00 indicates the territorial authority is “not further defined”. Auckland retains sequential codes from the community board classification.

The names for the classification are retained from the territorial authority and community board classifications.

Clipped version

This clipped version has been created for cartographic purposes and so does not fully represent the official full extent boundaries.

Macrons

Names are provided with and without tohutō/macrons. The column name for those without macrons is suffixed ‘ascii’.

Digital data

Digital boundary data became freely available on 1 July 2007.

To download geographic classifications in table formats such as CSV please use Ariā

Layer ID 111183
Data type Vector multipolygon
Feature count 88
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Territorial Authority Local Board 2018 (generalised)

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

7251
205
Updated
29 Sep 2019

This dataset was last updated on Stats NZ Geographic Data Service on 29 Sep 2019.

This dataset is the definitive set of local board boundaries for Auckland and territorial authority boundaries for the rest of New Zealand for 2018 as defined by Statistics New Zealand, as at 1 January 2018. This version contains 21 local boards in the Auckland Council.

​Local boards fall within the community board classification.Local boards were introduced as part of the new local government arrangements for Auckland in 2010. Local boards share governance with a council’s governing body and each has complementary responsibilities, guaranteed by legislation. Local boards can propose bylaws and they gather community views on local and regional matters. Local legislation enacted in 2012 allows for the establishment of local boards in areas of new unitary authorities that are predominantly urban and have a population of more than 400,000. The boundaries of local boards cannot be abolished or changed except through a reorganisation process.

Layer ID 103910
Data type Vector multipolygon
Feature count 88
Primary key TALB2018_V1_00
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

2013 Census counts by Urban Rural 2018

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

18937
170
Added
06 Dec 2017

This dataset was first added to Stats NZ Geographic Data Service on 06 Dec 2017.

The 2013 Census usually resident population count, household, and occupied dwellings (private and non-private) data has been rebased to the 2018 meshblock geography and is shown according to the new statistical geographies and urban rural classification developed as a result of the Statistical Standard for Geographic Areas 2018 (SSGA18) review. The data is experimental and is provided as a guide to understanding the impact of the new geographic boundaries on the previous census counts.

Note: This data has been randomly rounded to protect confidentiality. Individual figures may not add up to totals, and values for the same data may vary in different tables

For further information see the attachments below: Information about data; 2013 Census counts on UR2018 lookup; and ANZLIC 2018 Metadata Urban Rural.

Layer ID 92227
Data type Vector multipolygon
Feature count 722 (incl. 4 with empty or null geometries)
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Urban Accessibility Indicator 2023 (generalised)

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

1176
3
Added
30 Nov 2022

This dataset was first added to Stats NZ Geographic Data Service on 30 Nov 2022.

2023 Urban Accessibility Indicator update

For the 2023 IUA, there have been minor updates to align with changes to the urban rural (UR) boundaries and SA1 composition. The drive time analysis has not been re-run since the release of IUA 2018. The Wānaka urban area, whose population has grown to bemore than 10,000 based on population estimates, has been reclassified to a medium urban area in the 2023 UR. However, it will continue to be classified as a small urban area in the IUA until the analysis is re-run for the next major update.

Description

This dataset is the definitive version of the Urban Accessibility Indicator boundaries as at 1 January 2023, as defined by Stats NZ.

The Urban Accessibility Indicator (IUA) classificationprovides a consistent measure of urban accessibility in order to distinguish the degrees of rurality in New Zealand. IUA classifies the geographic accessibility of rural statistical area 1s (SA1s) and small urban areas according to their proximity, or degree of remoteness, to larger urban areas.

The IUA methodology uses drive time from an SA1 address weighted centroid to the outside boundary of the nearest major, large, and medium urban area (from the UR classification), to classify rural SA1s and small urban areas to one of five categories of accessibility or remoteness. Small urban areas and rural settlements are assigned to a single category based on the classification of the majority of their SA1s. The Open Source Routing Machine service using the OpenStreetMap road network was used to calculate the drive times.

Rural SA1s and small urban areas are classified to the following categories:

High urban accessibility:

0 to 15 minutes from major urban areas,

Medium urban accessibility:

15 to 25 minutes from major urban areas,

0 to 25 minutes from large urban areas,

0 to 15 minutes from medium urban areas,

Low urban accessibility:

25 to 60 minutes from major or large urban areas,

15 to 60 minutes from medium urban areas,

Remote:

60 to 120 minutes from major, large or medium urban areas,

Very remote:

more than 120 minutes from major, large or medium urban areas.

The urban accessibility indicator (IUA) classifies urban, rural, and water areas by type. The high and medium urban accessibility categories are considered to be peri-urban.

The indicators, with their codes in brackets, are:

urban areas – major urban area (111), large urban area (112), medium urban area (113),

small urban and rural areas – high urban accessibility (221), medium urban accessibility (222), low urban accessibility (223), remote (224), very remote (225),

water areas – inland water (331), inlet (332), oceanic (333).

A concordance between SA1 and Urban Accessibility can be found on Ariā.

Urban accessibility indicator is also available as an attribute on Statistical Area 1 Higher Geographies 2023 (generalised).

For more information refer to Urban accessibility – methodology and classification or the Statistical standard for geographic areas 2023.

Generalised version

This generalised version has been simplified for rapid drawing and is designed for thematic or web mapping purposes.

Digital data

Digital boundary data became freely available on 1 July 2007.

To download geographic classifications in table formats such as CSV please use Ariā

Layer ID 111195
Data type Vector multipolygon
Feature count 11
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Meshblock 2023 (Centroid Inside)

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

1091
6
Added
01 Dec 2022

This dataset was first added to Stats NZ Geographic Data Service on 01 Dec 2022.

This dataset contains the inside centroid point layer for the annually released meshblock boundaries as at 1 January 2023.

The "inside" centroid is a point which always falls inside each meshblock polygon as this is often desirable. The placement of the point is typically in the widest part of the polygon. The algorithms used are proprietary to ESRI and are related to label placement. Note that the "inside" centroid is NOT always the same as the center of gravity ("true" centroid) of the polygon as in some situations the true centroid may fall outside the meshblock polygon.

The dataset contains the EASTING and NORTHING attributes of the centroid point in NZGD2000 New Zealand Transverse Mercator (EPSG:2193) and LATITUDE and LONGITUDE of the centroid point in decimal degrees in WGS1984 (EPSG:4326) projection.

Non-digitised meshblocks cannot have a centroid.

Layer ID 111221
Data type Vector point
Feature count 57523
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Ward 2023 Clipped (generalised)

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

976
9
Added
30 Nov 2022

This dataset was first added to Stats NZ Geographic Data Service on 30 Nov 2022.

This dataset is the definitive version of the annually released ward boundaries as at 1 January 2023 as defined by the territorial authorities and Local Government Commission and maintained by Stats NZ (the custodian) clipped to the coastline. This clipped version has been created for cartographic purposes and so does not fully represent the official full extent boundaries. This version contains 224 wards, excluding ‘area outside ward’.

Wards are defined under the Local Electoral Act 2001 and result from dividing a territorial authority for electoral purposes. Wards were originally set up within any territorial authority with a population of at least 20,000. The ward system was designed to allow for the recognition of communities within a territorial authority and to increase community involvement in the local government system.

Territorial authorities can now choose whether they would like to maintain electoral wards. As a result, the number of wards has steadily decreased since they were first created in 1989. Ward boundaries are reviewed in the year before the three-yearly local government elections.

Wards are defined at meshblock level, and do not coincide with the statistical area 1 (SA1) geography or the statistical area 2 (SA2) geographies.

Numbering

Wards are numbered based on their corresponding territorial authority. Each ward has a unique five-digit number. The first three digits represent the territorial authority that the ward lies within. The following two digits are sequential and represent the number of wards within a territorial authority. For example, Westland District (057) has three wards, which are coded 05701, 05702, and 05703.

Some territorial authorities do not use wards. In the classification, these territorial authorities use ‘99’ for the last two digits of the ward code, and the descriptor “Area Outside Ward”.

Clipped version

This clipped version has been created for cartographic purposes and so does not fully represent the official full extent boundaries.

Macrons

Names are provided with and without tohutō/macrons. The column name for those without macrons is suffixed ‘ascii’.

Digital data

Digital boundary data became freely available on 1 July 2007.

To download geographic classifications in table formats such as CSV please use Ariā

Layer ID 111189
Data type Vector multipolygon
Feature count 233
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Māori Ward 2023 Clipped (generalised)

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

1128
6
Added
30 Nov 2022

This dataset was first added to Stats NZ Geographic Data Service on 30 Nov 2022.

This dataset is the definitive version of the annually released Māori ward boundaries as at 1 January 2023 as defined by the territorial authorities and/or Local Government Commission, and maintained by Stats NZ (the custodian), clipped to the coastline. This clipped version has been created for cartographic purposes and so does not fully represent the official full extent boundaries. In 2023, there are 34 Māori wards (excluding Area Outside Māori Ward) within 29 territorial authorities.

The Local Electoral Act 2001 provides that Māori wards may be established in territorial authorities. If a territorial authority decides to have Māori wards, the wards within the council are known as general wards and Māori wards.

The first Māori ward was established by representation review in 2019 and first appeared in the 2020 geographic boundaries released by Stats NZ. Changes to government legislation that allowed councils to decide on whether to include Māori wards in their arrangements resulted in 33 new Māori wards being added to the 2023 classification.

Māori ward boundaries are defined at meshblock level.

Numbering

Māori wards are numbered based on their corresponding territorial authority. Each Māori ward has a unique five-digit code. The first three digits represent the territorial authority that the Māori ward lies within. The following two digits are sequential and represent the number of Māori wards within a territorial authority.

Territorial authorities that do not have Māori wards use “99” at the end of the Māori ward code, and the descriptor “Area Outside Māori Ward”.

There is also a code of 99999 for those areas outside of territorial authority areas.

Clipped version

This clipped version has been created for cartographic purposes and so does not fully represent the official full extent boundaries.

Macrons

Names are provided with and without tohutō/macrons. The column name for those without macrons is suffixed ‘ascii’.

Digital data

Digital boundary data became freely available on 1 July 2007.

To download geographic classifications in table formats such as CSV please use Ariā

Layer ID 111191
Data type Vector multipolygon
Feature count 73
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Ward 2023 (generalised)

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

1100
7
Added
30 Nov 2022

This dataset was first added to Stats NZ Geographic Data Service on 30 Nov 2022.

This dataset is the definitive version of the annually released ward boundaries as at 1 January 2023 as defined by the territorial authorities and Local Government Commission and maintained by Stats NZ. This version contains 224 wards, excluding ‘area outside ward’.

Wards are defined under the Local Electoral Act 2001 and result from dividing a territorial authority for electoral purposes. Wards were originally set up within any territorial authority with a population of at least 20,000. The ward system was designed to allow for the recognition of communities within a territorial authority and to increase community involvement in the local government system.

Territorial authorities can now choose whether they would like to maintain electoral wards. As a result, the number of wards has steadily decreased since they were first created in 1989. Ward boundaries are reviewed in the year before the three-yearly local government elections.

Wards are defined at meshblock level, and do not coincide with the statistical area 1 (SA1) geography or the statistical area 2 (SA2) geographies.

Numbering

Wards are numbered based on their corresponding territorial authority. Each ward has a unique five-digit number. The first three digits represent the territorial authority that the ward lies within. The following two digits are sequential and represent the number of wards within a territorial authority. For example, Westland District (057) has three wards, which are coded 05701, 05702, and 05703.

Some territorial authorities do not use wards. In the classification, these territorial authorities use ‘99’ for the last two digits of the ward code, and the descriptor “Area Outside Ward”.

Generalised version

This generalised version has been simplified for rapid drawing and is designed for thematic or web mapping purposes.

Macrons

Names are provided with and without tohutō/macrons. The column name for those without macrons is suffixed ‘ascii’.

Digital data

Digital boundary data became freely available on 1 July 2007.

To download geographic classifications in table formats such as CSV please use Ariā

Layer ID 111190
Data type Vector multipolygon
Feature count 233
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Statistical Area 3 2023 (generalised)

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

1145
7
Added
01 Dec 2022

This dataset was first added to Stats NZ Geographic Data Service on 01 Dec 2022.

Statistical area 3 (SA3) is a new output geography, introduced in 2023, that allows aggregations of population data between the SA2 geography and territorial authority geography.

This dataset is the definitive version of the annually released statistical area 3 (SA3) boundaries as at 1 January 2023 as defined by Stats NZ. This version contains 929 SA3s, including 4 non-digitised SA3s.

The SA3 geography aims to meet three purposes:

  1. approximate suburbs in major, large, and medium urban areas,

  2. in predominantly rural areas, provide geographical areas that are larger in area and population size than SA2s but smaller than territorial authorities,

  3. minimise data suppression.

SA3s in major, large, and medium urban areas were created by combining SA2s to approximate suburbs as delineated in the Fire and Emergency NZ (FENZ) Localities dataset. Some of the resulting SA3s have very large populations.

Outside of major, large, and medium urban areas, SA3s generally have populations of 5,000–10,000. These SA3s may represent either a single small urban area, a combination of small urban areas and their surrounding rural SA2s, or a combination of rural SA2s.

Zero or nominal population SA3s

To minimise the amount of unsuppressed data that can be provided in multivariate statistical tables, SA2s with fewer than 1,000 residents are combined with other SA2s wherever possible to reach the 1,000 SA3 population target. However, there are still a number of SA3s with zero or nominal populations.

Small population SA2s designed to maintain alignment between territorial authority and regional council geographies are merged with other SA2s to reach the 5,000–10,000 SA3 population target. These merges mean that some SA3s do not align with regional council boundaries but are aligned to territorial authority.

Small population island SA2s are included in their adjacent land-based SA3.

Island SA2s outside territorial authority or region are the same in the SA3 geography.

Inland water SA2s are aggregated and named by territorial authority, as in the urban rural classification.

Inlet SA2s are aggregated and named by territorial authority or regional council where the water area is outside the territorial authority.

Oceanic SA2s translate directly to SA3s as they are already aggregated to regional council.

The 16 non-digitised SA2s are aggregated to the following 4 non-digitised SA3s (SA3 code; SA3 name):

70001; Oceanic outside region, 70002; Oceanic oil rigs, 70003; Islands outside region, 70004; Ross Dependency outside region.

SA3 numbering and naming

Each SA3 is a single geographic entity with a name and a numeric code. The name refers to a suburb,recognised place name, or portion of a territorial authority. In some instances where place names are the same or very similar, the SA3s are differentiated by their territorial authority, for example, Hillcrest (Hamilton City) and Hillcrest (Rotorua District).

SA3 codes have five digits. North Island SA3 codes start with a 5, South Island SA3 codes start with a 6 and non-digitised SA3 codes start with a 7. They are numbered approximately north to south within their respective territorial authorities. When first created in 2023, the last digit of each code was 0. When SA3 boundaries change in future, only the last digit of the code will change to ensure the north-south pattern is maintained.

For more information please refer to the Statistical standard for geographic areas 2023.

Generalised version

This generalised version has been simplified for rapid drawing and is designed for thematic or web mapping purposes.

Macrons

Names are provided with and without tohutō/macrons. The column name for those without macrons is suffixed ‘ascii’.

Digital data

Digital boundary data became freely available on 1 July 2007.

To download geographic classifications in table formats such as CSV please use Ariā

Layer ID 111202
Data type Vector multipolygon
Feature count 929 (incl. 4 with empty or null geometries)
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed
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